Theatre Tuscaloosa's 2016-17 Season: Share the Dream
Theatre Tuscaloosa's 2016-17 Season: Share the Dream

TIPS FOR AUDITIONING FOR THEATRE TUSCALOOSA

  1. PREPARATION
  • Bring a headshot and resume if you have one.  If you don’t, that’s okay.  You can put your experience on the audition form.
  • Know your type (age range, body type, performance style) and focus on the roles that are appropriate for you.
  • Do your homework.
    • Know as much as you can about the show. 
    • Know what role(s) you are interested in auditioning for, but do not limit yourself to just that role. 
    • Listen to the music.  Be familiar with it. 
  • You will not need to have a memorized monologue for this audition.
  • Choosing Songs
    • 16 bars (measures) but know the whole song.  Have music ready for the pianist.  Mark clear stops and starts.  Tape your music to a file folder or put it in a small three ring binder for the pianist.  Loose music can often get out of order and lost.  Rehearse it with a pianist before you audition to make sure you are singing in the right key!
    • KNOW YOUR SONG!!!!!  It will help with anxiety.
    • For Theatre Tuscaloosa generally we want a song in the “style” of the show or by the same composers/lyricist. 
    • If you are going to do a song from the show, BE FABULOUS!
    • Pick songs you love to sing!
    • Pick songs that show off your range but aren’t too difficult for you.
    • Look at the lyrics without the music.  Is it interesting?  Do you connect with it?
    • What song(s) does “your” character sing?  Be familiar.
    • Resources:
  • What do I wear?
    • Don’t wear a costume.  You can “suggest” style with your attire.
    • Wear something that is comfortable but shows you at your best.
    • Don’t wear distracting loud prints or lots of jewelry or makeup.
    • Avoid wearing all black or all red.  The curtains in our theatre are that color, and you will more than likely be standing in front of one of them.
    • Don’t wear cologne or perfume.
    • Wear appropriate footwear, not flip flops!  No excessively high heels!
    • Bring extra shoes for dance/movement if you don’t wear them.  (Character shoes, jazz shoes or tennis shoes.)
    • If you wish to change clothes for the dance/movement portion – wear “work out” type of attire.  No baggy/lose fitting clothes
    • Men – no hats
    • Men - nice shirt and pants (maybe even bring a jacket)
    • Hair out of your eyes.
    • Be yourself.  Wear clothes that fit!

 

2.  POISE/CONFIDENCE/PERSONALITY/PRSENTATION

  • Remember YOU ARE ALWAYS AUDITIONING!
  • Be early! 15 to 30 minutes early.
  • Be aware of your surroundings.
  • Be kind to everyone!!!!  People are listening everywhere (including the bathroom).
  • You are only in control of what/how YOU do.
  • It isn’t personal.
  • Listen and follow instructions.
  • Give your music to the pianist.  Take a moment to go over the tempo with him/her.  Take a deep breath.  Walk to the center of the stage/room.  Take a breath.  Look straight out and speak so we can hear 1.  Your name.   2.  Your audition number  3.  Title of song you are going to sing.  Smile!  Be confident!  Do not look into the eyes of the people you are auditioning for, but look slightly over their head.  Have fun!
  • You aren’t there to make best friends with the others auditioning.  Talk very little with others waiting.  You should be preparing.  If someone is persistent in talking to you, politely excuse yourself and find another place.
  • Don’t criticize the script, other actors, or the director!
  • Make your decisions about the character before you audition.  If the director offers suggestions beforehand, listen to them and make slight adjustments if necessary but don’t let it throw you.
  • If you get flustered, ask to start over if you are on the first page.  After the first page, just breath, gather, focus and move on.
  • Smile/Exude Confidence and positivity (you have the power in the room).
  • Your job is to convince them by doing a well-planned audition that YOU are what they are looking for.
  • Don’t waste your time thinking about “getting the role.”   Focus on doing your best audition. 
  • IF YOU CAN PICTURE SOMEONE ELSE IN THE ROLE, YOU WILL NOT GET IT.  LOOK AT THE AUDITION AS THE OPPORTUNITY TO PLAY THE PART.
  • The best actor doesn’t always get the role. You may not be right physically, but you have no control over that.  Focus on what you can control, the attention to the work.

 

3.  COLD READINGS

  • A "cold reading" is playing a scene with script in hand with little or no preparation.
  • Don't look down at the paper all through the reading.  The top of your head is not expressive.  Look quickly at the line and commit it to memory as best you can, then look up and deliver it.   Let the director see your expressions.  If your lines are too long to commit to memory at a glance, go ahead and repeat the process.  Just don't bury your head in the script.
  • If the director describes the character and the situation to you, listen!  Don't try to sneak a peek at your lines.  It's better to understand what the director is looking for than to focus on the next line.
  •  If you're reading with another actor, most of your lines will be communicated to him or her.  Look at what you have to say, and then communicate with the other actor.  Look up from the script and "play" the lines.
  • Don't be afraid to use space and movement during cold readings.  Gesture, move about the stage.  Have a reason to move, don’t just wander around the stage.
  • Listen to your partner's line rather than reading ahead.  Much of acting is reacting, and your silent response is often as important as your spoken one.  Let the director see your reactions.
  • If your partner has a long speech, you can glance down to see his last words.  When those words are given, then look down to see your own response and up again to deliver it.
  • Be conscious of your posture.  Everything about you should play the role--not just your voice.
  • If asked to read in a different way, take it as a compliment not a criticism.
  • Ask yourself, "What does this character have at stake?"
  • Try not to monitor your reading with self-critical judgments.
  • Hold the script in your non-dominant hand at about chest level so you can gesture normally with your other hand.  Don't wave the script about in the air.  You need not pretend the script doesn't exist, just minimize its presence.

(REFERENCE MATERIAL:  COLD READINGS AND HOW TO BE GOOD AT IT By Basil Hoffman)

 

4.  SCRIPT/CHARACTER ANALYSIS (BASIC ACTING TECHNIQUES APPLY)

  • Remember you have to look at the situation through the character’s eyes.  It is not objective; that’s reporting, not acting.
  • WHO are you (the character)?  Health, age, state of mind, social condition, situation in life…how does all that affect your behavior?
  • WHAT is happening in the scene and how does that affect your behavior?
  • WHERE is the event – how does that affect you directly?
  • WHY are you there?  What do you expect to happen?  How does that affect your behavior? 
  • WHEN does the event take place? How does that affect your behavior?
  • WHERE were you before the situation started and WHERE will you be after the scene ends?  How does that affect your behavior?
  • WHO are the other people in the script, or referred to in the script?  What do they say about you?  How do they behave toward you?  How does that affect your behavior?

5.  HERE’S WHAT THE CASTING PEOPLE ARE THINKING

  • I hope they do well.
  • I hope they don’t invade my personal space.
  • Was the actor prepared?
  • Does this person appear friendly, positive, and eager to work?
  • Is this someone I want to spend the next few months with?
  • Was the actor confident?
  • Was the actor aware of his/her type?
  • Was the actor kind to everyone?
  • Did they listen and follow instructions?
  • Were they dressed appropriately?
  • Was the material chosen appropriate for this show and their type?
  • Can I hear and understand the actor when singing and speaking?
  • Does the actor have a good mind/body/spirit connection?
  • Did they “sell” the song?
  • Did they move well?
  • Did they understand what they were saying/singing?
  • Did they bring a character to life or were they just “showing out?”
  • DOES THIS ACTOR HAVE A REPUTATION OF DOING GOOD WORK ON AND OFF THE STAGE? 

HAVE FUN.  BE JOYOUS.  DON’T BE OBNOXIOUS!  BE PLEASANT AND KIND!

 

TICKET OFFICE HOURS
Monday-Thursday 9am-5pm
Friday 9am-12pm
One hour prior to performances

ADDRESS
9500 Old Greensboro Road #135
Tuscaloosa, AL 35405

PHONE
205.391.2277

FAX

205.391.2329

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